1912 The Early Morning Waiter

An Australian, a man named in the Adelaide Advertiser as Mr W Maggin (sic) of Kurralta Park, Adelaide, South Australia, claimed to have invented a teasmade in about 1912. I believe this was William Magain. It was very similar to Richardson’s invention of 1904. An article in the Adelaide Advertiser published on 16th Feb 1922 provided the following details:

Details published in “The Advertiser” last Saturday concerning the invention in England of a contrivance which automatically lights the gas under the kettle, pours boiling water into the teapot, and calls the sleeping householder [title ‘Teapot that Calls You’ featuring Karslake’s Magic Kettle, published 11th Feb 1922], has brought to light a similar South Australian appliance, invented as far back as 1912. Mr W Maggin of Kurralta Park, near Richmond, writes: — “I invented an appliance some 10 years ago, which I called “the early morning waiter”. It is controlled by an electric alarm clock, which ignites a methylated spirit stove, placed under the kettle. When the water boils, the steam operates a false bottom in the kettle, thus releasing a spring, causing the kettle to tilt and pour water into a teapot placed ready to receive it. At the same time a shutter is operated, which extinguishes the flame of the stove and rings a bell to notify that the tea is made.” Photographs of this ingenious appliance will appear in “The Chronicle” next week.

The photographs below appeared in the Adelaide Chronicle on Saturday 25th February 1922.

Maggin Early Morning Waiter 1912
Maggin Early Morning Waiter 1912

The text reads:

A South Australian invention by Mr. W. Maggin, of Kurralta Park, near Richmond, called ‘The Early Morning Waiter.’ It is controlled by an electric alarm clock, which ignites a methylated spirit stove placed under the kettle. When the water boils, the steam operates a false bottom in the kettle, thus releasing a spring, causing the kettle to tilt and pour water int0 a teapot placed ready to receive it. At the same time a shutter is operated, whidh extinguishies the flame of the stove and rings a bell to notify that the tea is made.